Orbeli Institute of Physiology

 

Armenia | Yerevan

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About

The Orbeli Institute of Physiology’s main focus is neurophysiology. Here scientists investigate neuroplasticity, the mechanisms of motor and autonomic control, and much more. It was founded alongside the National Academy of Science Of Armenia and was a hub of neuroscience in the Soviet Union from the 1960’s to the 1990’s. The institute has a museum and archive dedicated to the preservation of Neuroscience research. Leon Abgarovich Orbeli was an Armenian physiologist who graduated from the Military Medical Academy and went on to work in Pavlov’s laboratory, became the director for various Soviet medical institutes and pioneered a new field of evolutionary physiology. The institute named after him is dedicated to continue his legacy in not only the pursuit of knowledge but also in its preservation.

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Leon Abgarovich Orbeli

The Prinzhorn Collection (Sammlung Prinzhorn)

 

Germany | Heidelberg

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The Prinzhorn Collection museum is dedicated to art created by men and women with mental disorders. The unique body of the original collection known worldwide is made up of approximately 6,000 works, all created by inmates of psychiatric institutions between 1840 and 1940. It ranges from water-colours, drawings, paintings and sculptures to textile works and texts. The major part of it was collected while art historian and psychiatrist Hans Prinzhorn (1886–1933) worked as assistant physician at the Psychiatric Hospital of Heidelberg University. Among the most famous artists and authors whose works are held include count Else Blankenhorn, Franz Karl Bühler, Karl Genzel, Paul Goesch, Emma Hauck, August Klett, August Natterer, Agnes Richter, Joseph Schneller, Barbara Suckfüll and Adolf Wölfli.

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Hans Prinzhorn

The Dolhuys

 

Netherlands | Haarlem

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This used to be an asylum for the insane which has been converted to a psychiatric museum. The museum advertises,“Experience the world of madness in the Dolhuys. Meet madmen and lunatics, or clients as they are known today, in our interactive museum and find out how the Netherlands has dealt with madness throughout the centuries.” Psychiatry is a lively topic. One in four Dutch people are affected by a mental problem. This does not mean we are any crazier than the rest of the world. We all know someone affected by depression, burnout or Alzheimer’s. Thanks to mental health care taking up a more prominent position in society, people with psychiatric problems have become a more noticeable presence in everyday life. Yet still not enough is known about psychiatry and people with psychiatric problems often face prejudice. We would like to encourage our visitors to think about the boundary between crazy and normal and question the representations of ‘madness’.

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MuSeele (Museum of Psychiatry)

 

Germany | Göppingen

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The MuSeele is a museum of the history of psychiatry in the psychiatric hospital Christophsbad in Göppingen, Germany. Psychiatry is a contested institution and for many people somehow eerie. Its extremely varied and partly tragic history contributes to this. The intention of this museum is to critically introduce as many aspects as possible to the public and to reduce barriers and prejudices without putting a varnish over the problems that still exist today. Four concepts are important in this presentation. Factually accurate information will allow visitors to arrive at their own conclusions. Provocative presentations offer the chance to probe deeper, to reflect, and to start conversations. Visitors can engage interactively with different themes and exhibits. Multi-media presentations of topics mean that all senses are addressed and engaged.

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The Psychiatry Museum (Das Phychiatriemuseum – Haina)

 

Germany | Haina

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About

The former monastery Haina has always attracted many visitor interested not only in the architectural design but also the history of the monastery and the hospital. The psychiatric history collection and hospital archive give a unique insight into the history of psychiatry that begins in the 16th century. During Cistercian Reformations, Haina monastery was incorporated into a hospital. It became a sanatorium in the 19th century. In the 50s, it was named Psychiatric Hospital. The museum has a rich collection of archival documents and hospital object specific to psychiatry and its history. The museum in Haina is supported by 20 psychiatric hospitals and clinics and contributes to understanding of dealing with “psychologically sick” throughout centuries. The museum aims to remove traditional prejudice, promotes critical thinking and motivates people to work with mentally ill and handicapped members of our society.

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Healing Centre of Asklepion in Pergamum

 

Turkey | Pergamum

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About

Asklepion is an ancient healing complex located at the base of the Pergamon acropolis in Turkey. It was built in honour of Asklepios, god of healing. The site was founded in the 4th Century BC around a sacred spring that still flows and became one of the best-known healing centres of the ancient world. It was second in importance only to Epidaurus in Greece and was the world’s first psychiatric hospital. The influential physician Galen was born in Pergamon and practiced here in the 2nd Century AD, having first made his medical reputation treating warriors in the gladiatorial games of the city. Treatments included psychotherapy, massage, herbal remedies, mud and bathing treatments, surgeries and the drinking of water, which were prescribed according to what dreams the patient had experienced – it was believed that dreams recounted a visit by the god Asklepios, who held the key to curing all illness. Information is taken from Ancient Origins.

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FENS          IBRO EPFL          Experimental Museology Lab eM+
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